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Old 2-Dec-2010, 1:59 AM   #1
mutton-javelin
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They still make antennas????

Hello all. Great website. Could someone give me some advice on selecting an antenna.


Here is my report (for the possible height of a roof antenna)

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...81a32cc453be41

I have a Phillips 32PFL3505D with an indoor antenna. I can currently view channels 2,4,5,7 and 7.1, 27 and 27.1 44.1,44.2,44.3,44.4 and 62 and 62.1.

Looking for Fox 25 specifically and beyond that, I guess as many channels as possible. What type of antenna could maximize the number of good channels?
I used 18 feet I think as the height as a possible antenna based on the height of the roof + height of the mast. There are two clamps on the side of the house now so I'm hoping they are still in good shape.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 2-Dec-2010, 4:31 AM   #2
John Candle
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Tv Reception

Read and understand this about REAL Channels and Virtual channels. http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=695 . I suggest a Winegard HD7695P antenna on the roof , with NO preamp. Pointed at 146 magnetic compass , WWDP 10 . This will get you the stations to the south east.
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Old 2-Dec-2010, 7:26 AM   #3
John Candle
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Tv Reception

Yes Tv antennas are still made. http://www.winegarddirect.com , http://www.channelmasterstore.com , http://www.antennacraft.net , http://www.antennasdirect.com , http://www.solidsignal.com , http://www.starkelectronic.com
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Old 2-Dec-2010, 3:48 PM   #4
Tigerbangs
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TV reception from Boston should be very easy for you in Sterling: A simple UHF antenna on the roof, like an AntennasDirect DB4 or a Channel Master 4221HD aimed at 120 degrees by your compass will pull in everything from Boston, including WFXT-FOX, WSBK, And WLVI-CW. Frankly, WMPF is my favorite: great old TV shows and movies!. Here is a good installation guide to show you how:

http://manuals.solidsignal.com/AntInstallGuide.pdf

Unless you HAVE to have a shopping channel, you can forget about WWDP: no one gives a C%^P about it anyway...LOL: a UHF antenna will do the job just fine for you, will save you money, and will be smaller and easier to mount.

Stark Electronics is in Worcester, and You-Do-It Electronics is in Dedham: both will have everything that you need, however, Stark is cheaper.

Last edited by Tigerbangs; 2-Dec-2010 at 3:54 PM.
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Old 3-Dec-2010, 1:25 AM   #5
mutton-javelin
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thanks for the info.

I figured a UHF would be enough. I'm just starting to learn about this stuff.

As a side note I called Comca$t to cancel today. I went last week to pick up box for the holiday football games. When I installed the box they could not activate it. I think they must have disconnected the service at the pole. the old trusty indoor antenna did the trick.

Last edited by mutton-javelin; 3-Dec-2010 at 1:34 AM.
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Old 3-Dec-2010, 1:38 AM   #6
mutton-javelin
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BTW what stations do you get in Springfield?

We used to pick up affiliates from Western Mass before all the cable systems killed that.

YOU WILL GET ONLY ONE NBC STATION AND LIKE IT!!!!
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Old 3-Dec-2010, 1:42 AM   #7
John Candle
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Tv Reception

You have Receivable channels to the south east in both the UHF and VHF High band channels 7 thru 13 thats why I say the HD7695P antenna it receives both UHF and VHF High. But then whatever you do , do not believe the truth. If you will like to receive the channels to the north east , I can tell you how , but what ever you do , do not believe the truth.
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Old 3-Dec-2010, 1:59 AM   #8
mutton-javelin
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Thanks for the advice. I guess???

Is it possible to receive those stations to the north east???
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Old 3-Dec-2010, 2:01 AM   #9
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Springfield has it's own channels ABC-40+FOX on 40-2, NBC-22, PBS-57 and CBS-3, which is a satellite of WFSB in Hartford. We also get all the other Hartford-New Haven channels here, too, as they come up the Connecticut River Valley very well. Boston is impossible here because of a ridge of mountains in Wilbraham and Munson that cut us off to the east. Comcast gives us WBZ-4 and WSBK-38, but no WGBH, WCVB, WHDH, WFXT, WMFP or WLVI. If you go 8 miles east, on the other side of the Wilbraham mountains, Boston comes in just fine. Again, we used to see all of the Boston stations on cable here, but they cut us off a few years ago so they wouldn't have to pay the Boston TV stations their fees.

With some effort, you can see WMUR channel 9 from Manchester, and WZMY from Derry the MyTV station. The Providence stations are also available, if you want to go with a big antenna but Boston is biggest market in New England, by far, has the greatest diversity of programming, and the best local production values. Most people will be happy just getting a decent signal from the major Boston stations.

Last edited by Tigerbangs; 3-Dec-2010 at 1:56 PM.
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 2:24 AM   #10
mutton-javelin
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Sounds good etc. I'm checking on these UHF models.

Will older antennas work as well as new ones? I have an offer for a free UHF antenna, I'm not sure what model. I'll post it if I find out.

I think I would like to maximize the number of stations if I can. It sounds like a good project.
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 2:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mutton-javelin View Post
Sounds good etc. I'm checking on these UHF models.

Will older antennas work as well as new ones? I have an offer for a free UHF antenna, I'm not sure what model. I'll post it if I find out.

I think I would like to maximize the number of stations if I can. It sounds like a good project.
If by "older" you mean older design, Yes... There is some misinformation running around that would try to make you believe that you need a special 'new' antenna to receive HD or DTV signals. The truth is that in quite a few areas, most OTA broadcasting was in the VHF band before cable providers dominated -- then monopolized the industry. Many people have not used their own antenna since the addition of many UHF transmitters. With the transition to DTV broadcasting many former VHF stations switched to UHF channels (for several reasons). So, for many folks with an old VHF only antenna on their roof, a new UHF or combination VHF/UHF will be needed.

The bottom line is that to successfully receive OTA signals, you need to use an antenna designed to receive the 'real' frequencies of the stations you are interested in. If you have an old combination VHF/UHF antenna that is in serviceable condition, by all means, give it a try. Antennas don't care about the modulation being digital or analog.

If you are interested, here is a link that shows the difference in sensitivity for quite a few antennas. http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ANTENNAS/comparing.html
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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 4-Dec-2010 at 2:52 AM.
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 3:00 AM   #12
mutton-javelin
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Wow there is a DB8
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 3:04 PM   #13
Tigerbangs
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Boston is now an all-UHF market: no VHF stations from the city, however, there are a couple of VHF stations in Providence and Manchester, NH. Unless you want the duplication of networks, there really isn't much need for a VHF antenna in the Boston area.
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 3:07 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mutton-javelin View Post
Wow there is a DB8
Yes, there is a DB-8, but that antenna is really overkill for your situation. If you lived in Fitchburg, Leominster, or well west of Worcester, you might find that the DB-8 offers you a reception advantage, otherwise the DB-4 is the right prescription. You may need a distribution amplifier if you plan to run multiple TV sets from the same antenna, however.
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 6:17 PM   #15
mutton-javelin
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That DB4 sounds good. I have no idea what the antenna is in the free offer. I was told it was UHF and he is sure it is.

As far as grounding. If I run the antenna cable to the splitter on the side of the house. Is this sufficient or do I need a separate copper wire from the antenna.


I have cable tv service from the pole to the side of the house. There is a splitter with a copper wire to a new ground rod right below it. Does this cover it, or do I need a copper wire from the antenna to that ground rod. Also, can I use the same ground rod or do I need a new one. I figured I would run the wire from the antenna to the splitter on the side of the house and use the existing cable inside. (2 outlets) So perhaps a pre-amp as well?
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Old 4-Dec-2010, 6:57 PM   #16
GroundUrMast
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Reuse the existing splitter / ground rod if they're in good shape. I would recommend grounding the mast with a #10 copper wire run directly to the ground rod.

http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=901
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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 4-Dec-2010 at 7:00 PM.
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Old 5-Dec-2010, 2:08 AM   #17
mutton-javelin
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The ground rod is 2 years old, thanks to the ice storm in Dec of 2008. A pole down the street came down and took our service with it. The service had to be replaced so we updated it.

Thanks for all the info.
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