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Old 29-Mar-2012, 5:43 PM   #1
mapliopl
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Installation help - Facing South when channels are north

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...0b863362e40e51

My report is above.

I have two areas for TV, room on main floor and basement. All are pre-wired with Directv and Cable connections.

I am looking to replace my current (inactive) Directv Dish with an OTA antenna. Need guidance because the mount is on the south side of the house, and from the report it appears all my channels are located on the opposite side. If I don't want to put the antenna directly ON the roof, will I have a chance to see anything when the antenna is facing south?

Also, My roof extends outward about a foot, so I can't get an extender to the antenna and have it go above roof.

Any advice?
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 6:19 PM   #2
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PS: currently, in the basement, I'm using an RCA HD Indoor Antenna and get about 4 channels, ABC KLKN-DT and a virtual channel 8.2, CBS KOLN-DT (to get it, I had to place the antenna in an awkward position), K29GL, K26JQ-D and some others from the same broadcasters, and finally KFXL-TV.

I don't get any others with that antenna.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 6:26 PM   #3
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Aiming your antenna point-blank into your own roof is a pretty good way to complicate reception.

Give it a try, but be prepared to re-locate the mount or to install a new mount in a more appropriate location.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 6:51 PM   #4
signals unlimited
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You may be able to get by with that location due to the signal strength of these near by channels. However I would move it up on that side untill it just clears the top, exposing it to the North but not so noticable from the ground on the North side. Be aware that in the attic would even be better than the shadowed location and would play well, but you would probably have problems receiving the stations from the other directions. As to the cable, all you need to do is eliminate any satellite devices between the antenna and the DTV and be sure to use splitters rated 50 to 1000 mhz.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 7:00 PM   #5
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How does the indoor antenna do when on the ground level floor and close to a north facing window?

Will you be doing all the work or will you be hiring some or all of it?
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 7:23 PM   #6
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By saying, 'pointing to your own roof' are you referring to the fact these antennas are not directional? Arent there directional ones? Or do they all rely on clear space above them?
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 7:29 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroundUrMast View Post
How does the indoor antenna do when on the ground level floor and close to a north facing window?

Will you be doing all the work or will you be hiring some or all of it?
I have it next to my tv and have tried it on the ground the closest to the window but the cord wasn't very long to go all the way to the window. It's about 4 feet away from it now, on top of my subwoofer.

But the window is 6 1/2 feet above ground.

I'd like to do the work myself if i can just replace the old directv dish, but i i need clearance above the antenna, i need to install it on the roof and probably would get some help for that.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 8:03 PM   #8
mapliopl
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Originally Posted by signals unlimited View Post
As to the cable, all you need to do is eliminate any satellite devices between the antenna and the DTV and be sure to use splitters rated 50 to 1000 mhz.
Can you elaborate? No satellite devices are there just cable hookups from the directv system.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:13 PM   #9
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An antenna in the basement is at a great disadvantage. The signal levels shown on your report suggest an indoor antenna may work, you can add another section of coax to see if you can find a good location.

The cables left from the satellite installation should support over the air signals well. Some parts used in satellite systems look like ordinary splitters but will block OTA signals.

A roof mounted antenna will have the best results in almost all cases. Perhaps in this case the next best would be a wall mounted antenna on the north side of the house. Would you be able to run coax from the north side of the house back to the existing cables at the current satellite dish mount?
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:24 PM   #10
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If the cable has no satellite splitters, just cable and connectors, it will work fine.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:30 PM   #11
mapliopl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroundUrMast View Post
An antenna in the basement is at a great disadvantage. The signal levels shown on your report suggest an indoor antenna may work, you can add another section of coax to see if you can find a good location.

The cables left from the satellite installation should support over the air signals well. Some parts used in satellite systems look like ordinary splitters but will block OTA signals.

A roof mounted antenna will have the best results in almost all cases. Perhaps in this case the next best would be a wall mounted antenna on the north side of the house. Would you be able to run coax from the north side of the house back to the existing cables at the current satellite dish mount?
I can try and see if my current satellite cables will get me any or more channels than this hookup I have with the internal antenna.

If I do get my antenna onto the north side, I would have to see if I can actually run my coax all the way around the house from the north to the south side, it'd be quite a bit of cable, for sure. I certainly don't want to rewire the house, but use existing ones. I just know nothing about these splitters that might block my signals, so I have to figure that part out as well.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:33 PM   #12
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Forgot to mention...for the best results use a directional antenna and a rotor. I would use the Aspen Eagel by Pro Brand. This rotor can operate on the antenna coax, eliminating the need for additional cable. Available at www.solidsignals.com.
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:34 PM   #13
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Actually, I think we have a big splitter that sends some wires down to my whole house. Will those screw up the VHF/UHF signals? That's what I'd need to get rid of? If so, then how would I get those wires to work in my house? They'll be disconnected?
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Old 29-Mar-2012, 10:50 PM   #14
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The splitter must pass 50 to 1000 mhz. if it does it will be fine. However If you use the rotor that I recomended, you will need to use a two way splitter with a DC pass to one port ahead of the house splitter. Connect the line that feeds the set located near the rotor control box to the DC pass port of the two way splitter and the other (isolated) port of the two way splitter to the input of the house splitter. This will work fine but you need to use 75 ohm terminators at the end of all unused outlets.
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Old 30-Mar-2012, 3:13 AM   #15
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Here's my setup. the back of my house faces directly south. And this is where my dish is setup. I also took a picture of the splitter.

If any of you have any more suggestions for what antenna would work and setup I need, I'd appreciate it.



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Old 30-Mar-2012, 3:42 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mapliopl View Post
...

If any of you have any more suggestions for what antenna would work and setup I need, I'd appreciate it.

...
Do you have terminators on the splitter's unused ports?
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Old 30-Mar-2012, 4:53 AM   #17
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I don't think so.

I tested my connection without alteration (hookups from them inactive Directv Dish) and it doesn't work. I most likely have to do some adjustments to this - that you guys mentioned before/add an OTA antenna.

I do get some stuff with that indoor antenna, thinking about keeping that and saving the hassle. The channels I'd be adding would be 1 NBC channel and the WB, PBS.

I don't know how much of an investment I'd dish out in a new setup...
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Old 30-Mar-2012, 4:53 AM   #18
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Wait, on the splitters, yes I do.
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Old 30-Mar-2012, 5:51 AM   #19
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I believe you can get all the major networks without resorting to a rotator.

If I were in this situation, I'd opt for a roof mounted set of antennas. Both from Antennas Direct - for VHF, a Clear Stream 5 and for UHF, a DB4e. I'd start by aiming the CS5 at real channel 12 but experiment to find the best aim to make CH 8, 10 & 12 reliable, possibly turning all the way around to point toward CH 8 & 10. The UHF antenna would be aimed at about 40° to start, again, experiment to find the best compromise between north and east.

The CS5 ships with a combiner so you can merge the VHF and UHF signals into one down-lead

If there is a chimney, I'd use a chimney mount and 10' mast. If no chimney, then a tripod and 10' mast. mount the UHF at the top, the VHF at least 4' lower.

The photo of the splitter appears to be a passive 8-way for the cable TV network, true? If so, it should work fine with OTA signals. I see terminators on three ports, so you have five TVs connected? Depending on how many sets are connected and how much cable lies between the antenna and farthest TV, you may need a preamp.
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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 30-Mar-2012 at 6:51 AM. Reason: preamp
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Old 30-Mar-2012, 6:46 AM   #20
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If the previous system is more than you want to consider, an RCA ANT-751 mounted on the north side, aimed NNW would do fairly well.

The long cable run and loss through the 8-way splitter would call for a preamp such as the Antennas Direct CPA-19 or Winegard HDP-269.
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