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Old 6-May-2013, 12:01 AM   #1
Ynot713
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Disconnected Antenna Interference

This is probably a dumb question.

I have a RCA ANT751 mounted about 8' high on a gable mount. I recently disconnceted it in favor of a Winegard HD8200 which I have mounted about
4' below it.

The Winegard is facing about 122 deg true (east towards Albany) and the RCA is facing about 255 deg true (west towards Syracuse)

Winegard is connected with the TVPRAMP1R (Which I am considiring upgrading).

Originally I tried to combine antennas but I got too much intreference so I just disconnectd the RCA and I am catching most of the stations I want to from the west on the back end of the Winegard, along with mostly everything to the east. My elevation is about 1315 feet, which is higher than most of my local towers and most everything else around me.

The stations I cannot recieve are WUTR (real 30), WCNY (real 25) and WMHT (real 34).

I find it strange that I am picking up WTVH (real 47) perfectly off the back end but channel 30 won't get picked up at all.

Here is my TV Fool Report:
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...1dda378dd2039b

I am wondering if my disconnected RCA antenna could be causing some interference and causing stations that I would normally get to not be picked up.

I ideally want as many Albany and as many Syracuse stations that I can get. A/B switch and a Rotor are impractical for my situation. So catching signals of the back end of a deep fringe preamped antenna seems to be my best bet. My signal is split in my basement to 5 TV's.

Please let me know any opinions or suggestions regarding this issue.

The preamp I was planning on upgrading to is the Winegard AP8275. (I am aware that a preamp will only amplify weak singnals and not make the antenna more powerful or anyhting like that.)

I'm still a novice with this stuff, but have been doing my homework and learning more as I go. Mostly trial and error.

Thanks Again,
Nick
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Old 6-May-2013, 3:28 AM   #2
teleview
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http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=13217.
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Old 6-May-2013, 5:14 PM   #3
GroundUrMast
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Quote:
The preamp I was planning on upgrading to is the Winegard AP8275. (I am aware that a preamp will only amplify weak singnals and not make the antenna more powerful or anyhting like that.)
A preamplifier will amplify both the weak and the strong signals. The strong local signals are going to overload the AP-8275. I would not use the RCA TVPRAMP1R or the AP-8275. The only Winegard preamp I would consider using would be the HDP-269. But the HD8200 already has 10 to 14 dB of gain across the H-VHF and UHF bands. With it aimed right at WKTV, real CH-29 you can expect overpowering signal levels at the input of most preamps.

Back to the basics... What signals are received by each antenna when only a known good coax is run from the antenna to a single TV? (No preamp, splitter or any other accessory.)

Given that you own two antennas, have you considered this option, http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=2882?
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If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

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Old 6-May-2013, 11:22 PM   #4
Ynot713
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Teleview,

Thank you for the link to my previous inquiry. This is a new setup that I am still trying to work the kinks out of. By posting that link, are you implying that I am running into to same issue I had last time?

GroundUrMast,

As always, thank you for your help and actually making suggestions to work through the issue. I will try your suggestion. I know from previous trials and errors that all my coaxial connections are good. But I will use the direct line from the antenna to the basement and hook up a tv before the signal is split to see what happens. Should I just disconnect the preamp completely when I do this?

Does this idea that I have to catch signals at my back end make any sense? It seems to be working right now with some of my further stations to the west but not all of them.

I did look into the Jointenna as that seems to be my best option. The A/B option is not feasible for me because I have no way to rerun cable from my basement to the tv's. (Whole house is spray foamed, which makes it extremely difficult.) I would even consider buying another small antenna and a jointenna to get the stations that i want to the west. Just not sure what to get at this point.

I looked at the tinlee site and was kinda confused on what component I would actually need.

I will get back to you after I try the coaxial test you suggested.

Thanks Again!
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Old 7-May-2013, 2:42 AM   #5
GroundUrMast
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Quote:
... I will use the direct line from the antenna to the basement and hook up a tv before the signal is split to see what happens. Should I just disconnect the preamp completely when I do this?
Yes, disconnect everything other than the antenna and the minimum parts needed to make the direct connection to the test TV. At the most, that means one antenna, one matching transformer and one coax cable that's no longer than practicality and safety require. The idea is to know with certainty what the antenna is actually receiving reliably. With that knowledge, you can then use the known signals to test additional down stream components and assess the need for amplification. Without knowing that the antenna is or is not producing a reliable signal, you're left guessing, which often leads to making deci$ion$ that make a complicated situation even more complicated.
Quote:
Does this idea that I have to catch signals at my back end make any sense? It seems to be working right now with some of my further stations to the west but not all of them.
Yes. Just beware that reception through the back of the antenna leaves you more vulnerable to multi-path interference. Strong LOS signals are obviously more 'robust', likely to be received reliably... However, a strong reflection from the opposite direction can be enough multi-path to give your tuner fits. The only practical way to find out if this will work for you is to try it.

Quote:
I did look into the Jointenna as that seems to be my best option. The A/B option is not feasible for me because I have no way to rerun cable from my basement to the tv's. (Whole house is spray foamed, which makes it extremely difficult.) I would even consider buying another small antenna and a jointenna to get the stations that i want to the west. Just not sure what to get at this point.
The tinlee AC7 series and CMN7 series products are the items most equivalent to the Channel Master Jointenna. These products are not designed to join two broadband antennas. Rather, they are designed to join a single channel source (which may come from a modulator, cut-to-channel, cut-to-band or broadband antenna) into a broadband feed. The Jointenna and AC7 products use filter networks to block all but a single channel (N) from entering one port, pass all channels but (N) on the other port... The output port is the combination of the (N) only + the All but (N) ports. So, if you have many channels to mix together, you'll need many Jointenna or AC7 units, each configured to a specific real channel. The CMN7 option may or may not be more economical. The bottom line is, you would be venturing into the realm of designing, building and operating your own CATV head-end. Be prepared for a bit of sticker shock if you ask tinlee for a price quote.

I would find a way to run more cable... or consider remote controlled RF switching... except I've already found Home Theater PC technology and network attached tuners:

http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=820
http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=13034
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Old 7-May-2013, 2:55 AM   #6
teleview
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Yes it is the same trouble shooting information concerning running one coax from the antenna direct to one tv , do not use a amplifier , no splitters etc.

Is this the same location as the other one??
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Old 7-May-2013, 3:21 AM   #7
Ynot713
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GroundUrMast,

When you talk about Remote RF switching, is there a device that would allow me to put a A/B switch in my basement before my signal is split to the 5 tv's, but allow me to remotely control that switch from the main floor of my house?

That would be an ideal situation.

Regarding this Silicon Dust HomeRun: I'm confused on how it actually works. I get that the coaxial from (in my situation a second antenna) would plug into the device. And then there is a Cat5e cable that is the output. I am assuming that would hardwire via a switch or router directly into my network. My question is: How do I actually access that content on my TV?

I was fortunate enough when I built my house to hardwire every room with Cat5e, Including my main television which I have another switch behind my entertainment center feeding my PS3, Tv, Stereo receiver, Apple TV etc. So all of my main home entertainment components are hardwired into my network. Is this how I would access the content from the HomeRun content on my television?

If this is what you arr suggesting, then the Silicon Dust HomeRun may be my best bet.
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Old 7-May-2013, 5:21 AM   #8
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Tinlee has some options including wireless control that may suit your situation: http://www.tinlee.com/RF_Switches.php?active=6

To use the SiliconDust HDHR tuner, you need a PC (Windows, Mac or Linux) to interface between your network and the display. The PC needs to have enough video 'horsepower' to smoothly display 1080i content. Windows Media Center (Win-7 HomePro ships with it) works fairly well... so there should not be a need to spend more money on software. VLC is free and open-source, I use it rather than the proprietary MS WMC.

I'm saying that I'm a bit of a techno-nerd... and the HDHR is the solution that works for me. I can understand if it does not appeal to everyone.

The display can be a TV with HDMI, HD component video, etc., so long as the PC and TV have matching interfaces. A PC monitor is also a viable alternative.
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