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Old 4-Jan-2010, 3:10 AM   #1
Raylo
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3
I hate Satellite and Cable and want OTA

I'm new to the forum and seeking advice for an antenna! I'm in a hilly area just outside of LA. Here's my signal analysis
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...c201ca52367600

I've looked at these models of antenna:
Winegard HDTV 8200U
DB8 Multidirectional HDTV Antenna
Philips Indoor/Outdoor UHF Digital/Analog TV Antenna (SDV2940/27)

How do these compare and which would be best for my situation? I've read a few reviews about the Philips on Walmart dot com and I am leaning towards that direction because they are local and I can return it easily if need be. I don't want to spend a lot because I'm saving money for a Tivo for the free signal. Thank you in advance!
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Old 4-Jan-2010, 10:20 AM   #2
mtownsend
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Hello and welcome!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raylo View Post
I've looked at these models of antenna:
Winegard HDTV 8200U
DB8 Multidirectional HDTV Antenna
Philips Indoor/Outdoor UHF Digital/Analog TV Antenna (SDV2940/27)

How do these compare and which would be best for my situation?
The Winegard 8200U is a huge VHF/UHF combo antenna (ch 2-69) that works well and and is well built. It will work great for your situation, but is really overkill for what you need.

The DB8 is a UHF only antenna. It's great at dealing with UHF, but it cannot help you with your local VHF stations (KABC, KCAL, KTTV, and KCOP).

The SDV2940/27 is the poorest performer of the antennas you mentioned. It is also a UHF only antenna. The raw antenna gain (not counting the 18 dB amplifier gain) is mediocre to poor. If you ignore your VHF station, this antenna will probably work for the UHF stations, but might be marginal on some channels.



Quote:
I've read a few reviews about the Philips on Walmart dot com and I am leaning towards that direction because they are local and I can return it easily if need be.
Since you'll lose four VHF stations with this antenna, there's no need to waste your time with this one.



You might want to try the Antennacraft HBU33, which is available at most Radio Shack stores (for easy returns). It is designed for channels 7-69, which covers everything you need.
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Old 5-Jan-2010, 10:31 PM   #3
Raylo
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Thank you mtownsend! I see that AntennaCraft HBU33 has a 60-70 mile range which sounds awesome. I've priced it at Radio Shack for $80 but I've seen it for under $40 at some online retailers. Do you have any suggestions of who to purchase from online? I'm trying to save as much money as we can.
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Old 5-Jan-2010, 11:05 PM   #4
mtownsend
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You might try solidsignal.com. They might not always be the cheapest, but I've had good results with them. warrenelectronics.com and summitsource.com are also pretty popular, although I have not personally used them.

Don't forget to compute to total purchase cost. Retailers like Radio Shack have higher prices, but you don't need to pay for shipping. For some large odd-shaped packages, the shipping can be almost as much as the product itself. And there's also the cost of returns in case you need to go that route.
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Old 9-Jan-2010, 4:09 PM   #5
Raylo
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Can the Antennacraft HBU33 be mounted in an attic? I'm worried about our HOA hassling us.
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Old 10-Jan-2010, 1:52 AM   #6
mtownsend
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I don't know how big your attic is, but the antenna is about 7 feet long and 4 feet wide. You'd get most of your channels at a compass heading 301 degrees), so you''ll need enough room to rotate it to that position.

Furthermore, you'll need to try and keep the antenna clear of any objects (ducts, pipes, metal structures, etc.), so it might require a bit of trial and error to find the optimum location within the attic that gives you the best reception.

BTW, if you weren't already aware of this, the FCC has an over-the-air reception devices rule (http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html). I understand the desire to minimize friction with your HOA, but in this particular case, you have the federal law on your side. It essentially boils down to saying that everyone has the right to install a reasonable antenna for OTA reception, and no landlord, HOA, city, county, or state law can prevent you from exercising that right. There are a few exceptions to this rule, so please read the document carefully.

Sometimes, just knowing that you have the law on your side is enough to help work out a reasonable compromise that everyone can live with.
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Old 10-Jan-2010, 6:28 AM   #7
OTAMAN2010
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Congressional Law

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtownsend View Post
I don't know how big your attic is, but the antenna is about 7 feet long and 4 feet wide. You'd get most of your channels at a compass heading 301 degrees), so you''ll need enough room to rotate it to that position.

Furthermore, you'll need to try and keep the antenna clear of any objects (ducts, pipes, metal structures, etc.), so it might require a bit of trial and error to find the optimum location within the attic that gives you the best reception.

BTW, if you weren't already aware of this, the FCC has an over-the-air reception devices rule (http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html). I understand the desire to minimize friction with your HOA, but in this particular case, you have the federal law on your side. It essentially boils down to saying that everyone has the right to install a reasonable antenna for OTA reception, and no landlord, HOA, city, county, or state law can prevent you from exercising that right. There are a few exceptions to this rule, so please read the document carefully.

Sometimes, just knowing that you have the law on your side is enough to help work out a reasonable compromise that everyone can live with.
Mtownsend is right about the law. Just explain to HOA, Did you sign a contract with HOA. You can always have it retrive. But the Congressional Telecommunications Act of 1996 give you the right to put up a antenna even on apartment buildings. Just as the Congressional law Art 4 give you the right to bear a fire arm. Speak up man don't be afraid. If its' you house you pay the bill Every month, not them.

I had a directional antenna and it was great for the direction I pointed it, 25 channels I had to rotate it for other channels. I later purchased the channel master 4228 a multi direction and received over 40 channels requiring no adjustments. VHF was weak until I broke of some rabbit ears and slide one on each side, and presto VHF was good. There are others DB2 amd many more. Radio Shack has a good omni derectional antenna with a built in amp. Flat round type not as noticeable.

Just some ideals. Hope it help.
The 4228

Last edited by OTAMAN2010; 11-Jan-2010 at 2:44 PM.
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