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Old 2-Nov-2011, 6:20 AM   #1
Cotton
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Need help on selecting best antenna for my location!

These are the channels TV Fool listed for my home: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...4bbae63d9c7e07

I don't plan to use a tv rotor or amplifier. I plan to use about 50 feet of RG6 cable. I may use black iron as a mast since it is heavy duty. The antenna will be mounted about 5 feet above the top of the roof. The antenna will be for only one tv. Since the black iron will go into the ground about two feet I am not sure if I will need a grounding rod.

I have a large 20 year old UHF/VHF Radio Shack Antenna now but the signal seems to be weak. It has a splitter to it and feeds several tv's. When I add this antenna it will only be for the tv I use most often and I will keep the Radio Shack Antenna for the other tv's. The new antenna will be around 40 feet from the existing antenna so it hopefully will not cause any interference for the new antenna.

I am guessing I need a deep fringe antenna like the Channel Master 3671 or Winegard 8200u. But, I really don't have a clue as to what type of antenna I need.

Any suggestions/recommendations? I appreciate any help anyone may give me.

Last edited by Cotton; 2-Nov-2011 at 8:03 AM. Reason: Added information
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Old 2-Nov-2011, 5:22 PM   #2
GroundUrMast
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If your goal is reception of the major networks, ABC, CBS, CW, Fox, NBC and PBS then you don't need a deep fringe antenna. A small UHF panel antenna such as a U4000, DB-4, CM4221 or HD4400 facing west would do nicely. To mount this style antenna does not require extreme iron working skills. A satellite J-pole is often used. An eave bracket or chimney strap is another very good option.

If your goal is reception of distant weak signals, then a larger antenna would be needed.

I would not consider a couple of feet of iron or steel to be a substitute for a solid connection to the existing ground system. http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=901
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If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

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Old 2-Nov-2011, 6:01 PM   #3
Tower Guy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroundUrMast View Post
A small UHF panel antenna
Both NBCs are on VHF. I'd add a CS600 VHF only to the UHF panel using a UVSJ.

Aim the CS600 at 76. The UHF would normally be aimed at 249 but may do best with the reflector removed.
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Old 2-Nov-2011, 9:47 PM   #4
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Thanks for the catch TG
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Old 2-Nov-2011, 11:36 PM   #5
Cotton
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At one time I almost bought the Channel Master 4221 four bay antenna and read someplace that it does as well as the CM4228 eight bay antenna. Maybe the Antennacraft u4000 is better than the CM antennas.

If I get the four bay antenna I guess I could just add it to the same mast as the Radio Shack antenna I have now and combine the signals. I have a large Beech Tree near the antenna I already have up, (on the West side), and thought I may need to move the mast to a better location. Any ideas on that?

Would I need to ground the antenna RG6 wire with a grounding block or just ground the antenna mast?

Sorry for all the questions but there are so many variables I have to consider.

Last edited by Cotton; 2-Nov-2011 at 11:52 PM. Reason: Incorrect antenna number
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Old 3-Nov-2011, 12:17 AM   #6
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The key difference between the 4-bay and 8-bay panel antennas is the forward beam width. The 4-bay will receive signals from a wider arc than the 8-bay. The wide angle comes at the expense of some gain, which in your case is not a problem because you have good signal levels to work with.

If the existing antenna is not bent, broken or corroded, and if it look like this, Log / Yagi then it could be used as a VHF antenna... just connect it to the VHF port on a UVSJ as TG suggested.

If you can avoid 'shooting' through the nearby tree(s) you'll usually see better signal quality.

I run a #10 or heavier copper wire from the mast to the nearest ground rod. I run the RG-6 down close tho the same ground rod where I install a coax ground block. The coax ground block is tied to the ground rod with a short length of #10 copper wire. I also verify the ground rod is tied to the electrical service ground system with a #6 or heavier copper wire.
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Old 3-Nov-2011, 1:27 AM   #7
Cotton
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Yes, my VHF/UHF Radio Shack Antenna looks like the one in the link you sent me. Mine seems to be larger with more elements and seems to be in excellent condition. I think it may have been the largest Radio Shack had around 20-25 years ago. For the most part I get good reception except for some cutouts of the signal.

I think I will go with a 4-bay antenna and connect with the combiner switch you mentioned. Someone sent me a private message and said the Antennacraft U-4000 may be a good one.

I am now using a 50' length of RG59 cable. Would it be worth the effort/cost to upgrade to RG6? If so what specifications on the RG6 cable?

Of all the 4-bay antennas which one would you buy for the signal area I am in?

Thanks in advance.

Last edited by Cotton; 3-Nov-2011 at 1:56 AM.
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Old 3-Nov-2011, 3:02 AM   #8
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Over a 50' run, expect RG-59 to have 1 dB more loss than RG-6. http://www.rfcafe.com/references/ele...coax-chart.htm

The DB-4 can be installed with or without the reflector grids as I recall. If installed with out the reflector grids, the antenna will receive well from the front and the rear. You have two major groups of stations, east and west of you. The new DB-4e appears to be displacing the original DB-4 so if you want to beat a big price jump, get one quick.
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