TV Fool  

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 3-Jul-2014, 5:25 PM   #21
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,749
Generally, you'll find that aiming at the ridge line of the obstructing terrain will be the best tilt setting. If you were after DX signals that were skipping off the upper layers of the atmosphere, a slightly higher tilt angle might be useful. But KIRO is a local signal and very unlikely to bounce a useful signal off the upper layers of atmosphere. The angle would be too steep.

An option for powering the PCT amp remotely with no need for a second coax run: http://www.amazon.com/PCT-Inserter-M...power+inserter

http://www.pctstore.com/v/vspfiles/a...on%20sheet.pdf

Yeah, there can be a wide variation in performance between tuners...
__________________
If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

(Please direct account activation inquiries to 'admin')

Last edited by GroundUrMast; 3-Jul-2014 at 5:29 PM.
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Jul-2014, 6:36 PM   #22
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Thanks for the advice regarding the elevation tilt setting. Sounds right.

Checked my PCT installation guide and, sure enough, option 2 provides for remote power! Thanks for pointing this out. I had forgotten about that.

I used to write technical procedures in my working days. I wonder if there would be interest in my writing an improved assembly and installation for the XG91? Perhaps the occasional amateur builder would find it useful.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Jul-2014, 6:58 PM   #23
ADTech
Antennas Direct Tech Supp
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,930
I used to give our new hires a 91XG to assemble using only the instructions that come with it. If they put it together successfully, they were ready to help customers!

It's unlikely that the old instructions will be re-written any time soon, if at all. The 91XG is such a tiny, tiny slice of our gross sales that we still have plenty of inventory from our last production run a while back. I don't know if, when the time comes, we'll have another run of them or if management will do something different.
__________________
Antennas Direct Tech Support

For support and recommendations regarding our products, please contact us directly at https://www.antennasdirect.com/customer-service.html

Sorry, I'm not a mod and cannot assist with your site registration.
ADTech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Jul-2014, 11:28 PM   #24
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Thanks for the reply, ADTech. I was thinking of posting here in the appropriate forum. Some of us are not mechanical geniuses! For example:

Step 1.) When I assembled the boom I noticed the boom wasn't straight. Scratching head, I noticed that I had pushed the boom ends into the matching clamp but the screw head was UNDER the clamp instead of on top. A line ought to be added saying, "Be sure the screw heads appear on top of the clamp instead of underneath." I was simply following the directions! They didn't say to untighten the clamp first so the screw head would be on top. It never occurred to me. Did I mention I was not a mechanical genius?

Step 2.) Place the balun box - which way? In which hole?
I didn't notice the thumb screw in the materials when I did this and instead, undid the screw and wingnut from the end of the boom, discarded the wingnut and attached the balun box with that screw - backwards, as it later turns out.

After stumbling with these instructions, trial and error, it seems to me the assembly steps are out of order. I think the order should be steps 1, 4, 3, 2, 5,6.

It makes more sense to do step 4 after step 1 because the instructions do not tell you exactly where the tilt bracket should be installed. The location of the tilt bracket can only be properly determined after all the directors are installed. And then the orientation of the balun box becomes more obvious, too.

Just got my mast sections. Need to go to Rad Shack for some guy wire hardware.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Jul-2014, 1:34 AM   #25
Pete Higgins
Member
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 83
RE: Difficult location 15 miles west of Seattle

kenj66,

I also live in the shadow of a mountain. My mountain is 3.5 miles from my house and is home to 1 full power UHF TV station and several high powered FM stations (plus numerous other communication services). I have to point my antennas right at those stations to get the 1 & 2 Edge LA stations 58 miles away. I have found two amplifiers that donít show pronounced overload under these conditions. The first type is a PCT MA2-M + 15 dB cable drop amp. which is smaller but similar to what you already have (without the variable gain feature). These are ideal in mixed strong/weak signal environments because they are designed to work with the typically much stronger cable TV signals. I mount mine right at the antenna, and tape the connector's with electrical tape to whether proof the connections. Iíve had one tie wrapped to a pushup mast for 3 years and itís performed flawlessly.

The other one is the RCA TVPRAMP1R that GroundUrMast recommended. They are cheap (<$25.00), have switchable dual inputs for combination or separate VHF/UHF antennas and also have a switchable FM trap to reduce overloading by FM stations.

Here is a link to my TV Fool report for comparison:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...1dda169109ca5c

Since you already have it, I would definitely recommend using the PCT MA-B1015-1A-VG @ your antenna.


When you get your antenna all setup check out this link:

http://www.highdefforum.com/local-hd...r-10-00-a.html

I bought one of the RTL2832U + R820T DVB-T Software Defined Radio (SDR) USB Tuner cards (for $8.72 from China) just after the first of the year and had so much fun with it that I bought two more (a pair & a spare?). They tune from ~22 MHz to 1.7 GHz and mine works really well just hooked to my TV antennas through a splitter. I use a free open source wide-band spectrum analyzer software program with it called RTLSDR Scanner. It has proven invaluable comparing different antenna & amplifier configurations. See the attached for a low res version of what it can do.

Even more fun is a program called SDR# (read SDR Sharp). This application also offers a Spectrum Analyzer display but additionally, can produce a Waterfall display or can simultaneously display both. When you see a signal on the FFT you can click on it, automatically tuning to it and opening the audio channel. It also lets you store frequencies (in groups) for later recall. Iíve already created groups for FM Broadcast, Weather Radio, VHF & UHF Air bands (I live 4 miles from March ARB), 10 Meter Ham band and 6 Meter, 2 Meter 220 and 440 MHz Amateur repeaters. This amazing program also demodulates CW, AM (including DSB, LSB & USB) and both Wide (FM broadcast) and Narrow band FM (police, fire & Amateur radio).

I use it all the time for listening to FM radio on my computer.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg HDB8-X comparason Capture.JPG (170.9 KB, 479 views)
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Jul-2014, 3:58 AM   #26
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Hi Pete,

I read your thread on High Def Forum. Fascinating stuff. At one time in my life I would have jumped on a project like this. However, you mentioned that the dongle and software were not really suitable for real-time tuning in TV signals. In fact I read where the complete sweep took almost 7 minutes. Unless the sweep could be tuned to one carrier and thereby sped up, I don't see the utility in the SDR dongle. Some of the unique tuner devices available these days seem more promising.

Thank you for sharing your experience with TV preamps. I tried that PCT preamp with my Monoprice HDA-5700 and it made absolutely no difference. I always thought an amplifier was an amplifier - makes any signal bigger. Not so with these beasts.

I just got back from Rad Shack and - guess what? They don't carry much antenna hardware anymore! Who knew? If I had known that I would have ordered what I needed last week. They suggested Lowes Hardware. The associate at Lowes looked at me funny and asked, "Your putting up an antenna?!" I found some over priced hardware but no turnbuckles. I found wire suitable for guying but they wanted 26 cents/foot!! Looks like the antenna raising will have to wait a few more days. BTW, Lowes had a half dozen 4 1/2 foot mast sections, just like the ones I ordered. They were only 76 cents more and I wouldn't have had to pay the outrageous shipping price. The guy helping me hadn't even noticed they were carried!

Last edited by kenj66; 4-Jul-2014 at 4:49 PM.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Jul-2014, 6:16 AM   #27
Pete Higgins
Member
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 83
RE: Difficult location 15 miles west of Seattle

kenj66,

7 minutes is to scan from 470 MHz (channel 14) to 700 MHz just 2 MHz above channel 51. Narrower ranges take less time.

Quote:
Some of the unique tuner devices available these days seem more promising.
I agree. The utility is in being able to capture a snapshot of the entire spectrum and compare it to another snapshot of the same chunk of spectrum. I often do this when I'm comparing two antennas or two different amplifiers.

Try Home Depot & Walmart for local. Iím using Home Depot's turnbuckles and RG-6.

3/8 in. x 10-1/2 in. Zinc-Plated Turnbuckle Hook/Eye
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-3-8-in-x-10-1-2-in-Zinc-Plated-Turnbuckle-Hook-Eye-10086/202183408

1/8 in. x 50 ft. Galvanized Uncoated Wire Rope
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-1-8-in-x-50-ft-Galvanized-Uncoated-Wire-Rope-13060/202048206

500 ft. RG6 18 AWG Coaxial Black Cable
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Southwire-500-ft-RG6-18-AWG-Coaxial-Black-Cable-56918245/202316478

RCA Antenna Pre-Amplifier
http://www.walmart.com/ip/RCA-Antenna-Pre-Amplifier/14554631


This is a company I can recommend for mail order.
Channel Master CM3084 Wire Guy Galvanized Steel 100 FT
http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?p=CM3084&ss=205721

Best to plan everything you need and order in one shipment or the shipping will kill you. Good luck and let us know how everything works out.

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 4-Jul-2014 at 6:27 AM.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Jul-2014, 10:44 PM   #28
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Very helpful, Pete. I was able to get the remaining hardware from Home Depot and Lowes. I'm hoping to get the XG91 in the air this afternoon.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 6:26 PM   #29
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Well, I didn't get the XG91 up yesterday. Seems folks wanted to watch fireworks.

I have a couple of questions.
The XG91 is supplied with a dandy clamp which allows for a tilt adjustment. The clamp is attached to the tilt bracket. The photos show the mast extending up, past the boom, yet there was no clamp provided to attach the boom to the mast. Should I find a mast clamp for the boom or is this simply not necessary? It seems like it would make the antenna stronger against the elements. On the other hand, attaching the tilt bracket clamp at the top of the boom would give me 5 or six inches more elevation. Here is a photo:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxY...it?usp=sharing

What is this? It was supplied with the antenna kit.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxY...it?usp=sharing

Obviously, it is a weather boot. However, I have never seen one with no opening for the cable!
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 7:42 PM   #30
ADTech
Antennas Direct Tech Supp
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,930
One of these days, I'll see if the web guy can Photoshop that mast section out of the photos.

Attach the tilt bracket assembly to the U-support only at or near the center of gravity. Avoid extending the mast through the space occupied by the directors.
__________________
Antennas Direct Tech Support

For support and recommendations regarding our products, please contact us directly at https://www.antennasdirect.com/customer-service.html

Sorry, I'm not a mod and cannot assist with your site registration.
ADTech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 8:27 PM   #31
Pete Higgins
Member
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 83
RE: Difficult location 15 miles west of Seattle

kenj66,

We went to my oldest son’s house yesterday for a BBQ & to watch fireworks. He’s retired also and it’s neat to finally be able to get together without day-off planning.

Quote:
Should I find a mast clamp for the boom or is this simply not necessary?

My single 91XG stayed mounted to the top of my mast for a couple of years without any problem. I had it tilted up slightly to point at the visual horizon (the top of Box Springs mtn.) When I added my second 91XG below the first, the mast just passed through the single clamp, alongside the boom and extended up to the clamp on the top one. The top 91XG boom sat an inch or two above the mast. So, "simply not necessary".

Quote:
...attaching the tilt bracket clamp at the top of the boom would give me 5 or six inches more elevation.
Yep, and that’s the way I’d do it, although I doubt the extra inches would make a measurable difference. That method does minimize degrading mast to director element interaction.

Quote:
I have never seen one with no opening for the cable!
I’ve seen two, and they both came with my 91XG’s. I used an xacto knife to slice the end off so the opening was slightly smaller than my RG-6 to give it a snug fit and then installed the compression connector. If you’re using cable that already has the ends installed, I’d just attach one end to the antenna and wrap the connection with electrical tape to weather proof it. I start from an inch down the coax, overlapping wraps and continue up until I’ve covered the balun molded plastic extrusion. Then I generally pull a tie wrap tight over the electrical tape to keep the top wrap from unwrapping.

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 5-Jul-2014 at 8:45 PM.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 9:03 PM   #32
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Thanks again, ADTech. That tilt bracket mast clamp is a good design. I will move it to the very top of my new mast, gaining a few more inches height.

I knew enough that the array mounting ought to be balanced and I initially tried to mount the U-support so it was evenly placed about the balance point but there isn't enough room for the rear clamp until the space between the 5th and 6th director. However, attaching there causes interference with the forward clamp so the rear clamp must be moved to between the 6th and 7th director. In order to discover this all the directors really need to be mounted to the boom first.

Since the U-support now is not centered for weight distribution the dandy mast clamp must be adjusted further back on the U-support, which can be done simply by holding the completed array upside down by the U-support until the weight balances in your hand. I would point out that the photos in the instructions show the mast clamp attached to the center of the U-support.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxY...it?usp=sharing

Also, the photo with the inset saying, "Attach cable here" appears to be incorrect. My balun box has the cable connection facing down and the rubber weather boot, without rear hole, was loose in the bag. So the caption surrounding the photo is rather misleading. The balon box also has clips on the side, which made me wonder if something was missing from my kit of parts.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxY...it?usp=sharing

My new 4 1/2 foot long mast sections are RCA branded and are carried by Lowes and Walmart. I didn't realize when I ordered them they were bright gold! My wife is not greatly impressed by this exotic array on our roof and all the others roofs are "clean" from such eye-catchers since most have cable
TV. But GOLD?! Sigh.

@Pete. More advice, thanks!

A stacked array of XG91s - wow! I'll bet the directivity is superb.

About 10 years ago I self-installed my own Dish Network system. Back in the day, Rad Shack carried all sorts of antennas and accessories, tools and so on. I got from them some tape designed for sealing connectors from the elements. It was rubbery and you would stretch it as you wound it around the connector, making an excellent seal. It worked very well. I must see if I can find a source for it.

EDIT: I found it! Scotch Professional Mastic Electrical Tape. This stuff is wonderful for weather securing F-connectors.

BTW, I have been fiddling with the array - not at full height. I raised the mast briefly to full height and noticed that the tilt angle (9 degrees) seemed higher than necessary. I am not a mechanical genius - and not a math wizz either. So, raising my mast 5 feet higher it seems I should reduce the tilt angle, yes? I don't understand why this is so.
Here is photo of the tilt angle with array just above roof level:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BxY...it?usp=sharing

Last edited by kenj66; 6-Jul-2014 at 2:15 AM.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 10:20 PM   #33
ADTech
Antennas Direct Tech Supp
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,930
Yeah, the instruction sheet is somewhere between 6 and 9 years old and hasn't been updated in the meantime to reflect the changed balun (or anything else). We just don't sell enough of them to justify investing more time and money at the moment in a legacy product.

For the weather boot, nip the tip, slid it on the bare coax, then install the compression fitting.
__________________
Antennas Direct Tech Support

For support and recommendations regarding our products, please contact us directly at https://www.antennasdirect.com/customer-service.html

Sorry, I'm not a mod and cannot assist with your site registration.
ADTech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Jul-2014, 11:31 PM   #34
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
I must say, the 6-9 year old design is impressive. I have never worked with a high-performance, deep-fringe antenna before and I will add my recommendation to those already posted in this forum. I got all but one of the desired network affiliates in Seattle and the in-line amp snapped that right in. Lots of bonus channels, too.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6-Jul-2014, 12:59 AM   #35
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Yikes! Where do I mount that PCT pre-amp? Hadn't thought about that yet. Before hoisting the antenna I better figure that out. Is there a section in the forum where that has been covered already?

Edit: I think I will put in about 12 feet of coax from the antenna and mount the PCT under the eaves. That will solve the problem and provide much improved weather protection for it.

Last edited by kenj66; 6-Jul-2014 at 2:17 AM.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6-Jul-2014, 4:48 AM   #36
Pete Higgins
Member
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 83
RE: Difficult location 15 miles west of Seattle

kenj66,

As GroundUrMast alluded to in post 19, it is better to keep an amplifier as close to the antenna as is practically possible. The reason is that for a given antenna and location the best signal exists at the antenna terminals. Everything beyond that degrades the received signal (connectors ~.05 dB ea., coax (depends on frequency & length), splitters ~3.5 dB for a two way, ~7 dB for a 4-way etc.). Once the signal is lost, nothing can restore it. The idea behind using an amplifier is to take the cleanest signal possible and amplify it up before it is degraded by traveling through your distribution system. The amplifier compensates (or more than compensates) for the distribution losses. So as not to sound too negative, however, no matter where you put the amplifier, it will accept whatever quality signal exists at that point and alleviate loss beyond that point in your distribution system.

As I already mentioned, cable loss in coaxial cable increases with both frequency and run length. Channel 14 starts @ 470 MHz and the high frequency edge of channel 51 is at 698 MHz. To give you a feel for the difference in performance I compared the losses between mounting the amp very near the antenna using a 3’ section and further down using a 12’ length. I also thru in a 38’ length of coax with 3 dB loss @ 698 MHz because most people are familiar with 3 dB doubling the signal and -3 dB halving the signal.

Cable loss in typical RG-6 with connectors:
3’ @ 470 MHz (Ch. 14) = .2 dB ~= 5% or you retain 95 % of your antenna terminal signal
3’ @ 698 MHz (Ch. 51) = .3dB~= 7% or you retain 93 % of your antenna terminal signal

12’ @ 470 MHz (Ch. 14) = .8 dB~= 17% or you retain 83 % of your antenna terminal signal
12’ @ 698 MHz (Ch. 51) = 1.0 dB~= 21% or you retain 79 % of your antenna terminal signal

38’ @ 470 MHz (Ch. 14) = 2.4 dB~= 42% or you retain 58 % of your antenna terminal signal
38’ @ 698 MHz (Ch. 51) = 3.0 dB~= 50% or you retain 50 % of your antenna terminal signal

If your signals are strong enough, the extra .6-.7 dB loss won’t make any difference. If you’re near the “digital cliff” on some channels it may make all the difference in the world.

Here is an example of how I mounted my smaller PCT MA2-M’s to my 91XG's:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4AM...p=docslist_api

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 6-Jul-2014 at 5:06 AM.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7-Jul-2014, 12:09 AM   #37
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Hey, Pete. Clever mount, using a male to male barrel connector. However, I would be concerned how to keep the balun box from breaking under stress. Side winds would be a consideration. Some interference with the director, reflector efficiency also seems involved.

I had considered drilling a couple of holes in the U-support and mounting there but weighing the tradeoffs I like getting the preamp out of the weather. I got all desired channels and then some without using the preamp and CBS on channel 39 comes in with it. So, I like that option best. Thanks for calculating the various losses!

Now I'm waiting for the PCT remote power inserter to come.
BTW, setting up the guy wires is a pain. In hind sight this array works so darn well I wish I had settled for just one 4 1/2 mast section which would not have required the guys.

BTW, I was wondering why everyone here but me refers to the Antennas Direct model as 91XG. The AD website refers to it as such. However, the instruction sheet I got says, in more than one place, XG91. I guess nomenclature has changed in 6-9 years.

Last edited by kenj66; 7-Jul-2014 at 12:14 AM.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7-Jul-2014, 1:53 AM   #38
Pete Higgins
Member
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 83
RE: Difficult location 15 miles west of Seattle

kenj66,

We get wind gusts in the 60-70 mph range all the time and in the two years I had the 91XG up with the amp attached that way it was rock solid. As far as interfering, -logic would dictate it did but I couldn’t see any difference in performance between it mounted that way or tie wrapped to the lower support bracket. I did it more for convenience than anything else.

At one time, I actually ran 4 of those little amps., one on my high VHF antenna, one each on my two 91XG’s and a fourth on my Winegard HD6065 10 Element FM Antenna. I just ran a separate power coax & built a mast mounted 15 V power distribution box to power all of them. I couldn’t find a UVSJ to supply power and combine all three in a single coax. The FM antenna had a separate RF run but since I already had power on the mast I powered its amp. the same way.

Why don’t you try mounting the antenna on one mast section without guys? You can always add the second one later if you determine you need it. I’ve had two brand new 4Ĺ‘ sections for probably the last 30 years that I thought I might need at some point and have never used. By-the-way, they are gold!

No idea why or when the nomenclature changed. I only got back in to OTA TV in 2010, more as a hobby after I retired than to save on the cable bill. By then they were advertised and talked about as 91XG’s. I did see some posts for XG91’s but thought they were due to dyslexic typing.

Hope you had a great 4th. I know I sure did.

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 7-Jul-2014 at 1:55 AM.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7-Jul-2014, 11:37 AM   #39
ADTech
Antennas Direct Tech Supp
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,930
Our model is the "91XG", the SKU is "UE-MX91" which is the manufacturing facility's designation. The Internet Wayback machine shows that in Dec of '03, it was called the 91XG on our website. https://web.archive.org/web/20031220...geAntennas.htm

Confused yet? Like I said, the instructions have never been updated since the antenna was added to our line several years before I started here.
__________________
Antennas Direct Tech Support

For support and recommendations regarding our products, please contact us directly at https://www.antennasdirect.com/customer-service.html

Sorry, I'm not a mod and cannot assist with your site registration.
ADTech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8-Jul-2014, 12:09 AM   #40
kenj66
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: 15 miles west of Seattle
Posts: 42
Well, this has been fun. I found a wonderful antenna and it's actually a 91XG. I imagined that once everything was in place I could point it north and see what I could pick up from Vancouver, BC, and point it south and see what I could pick up from Portland. A little DX-ing as we called it in my Ham Radio days. Let's see....... that was perhaps 50 years ago!

I have decided to "cool my jets" as we also used to say, and forgo the more elaborate setup. I have neuropathy in my feet and my wife is quite apprehensive about my climbing around on the roof. So, I have decided to move my eave mount to the back of the house, use a single 4 1/2 foot mast thereby requiring no guy wires. Happily, I get all the stations I wanted using the preamp. The preamp will be mounted under the lower eaves where I can get to it with a modest ladder. I'll use a 25 foot piece of RG-6 quad shield to the amp, 50 feet to the splitter and the entrance to the house. The tradeoffs in this configuration will be just fine.

And, I have met (virtually) some great people! This is very good forum and appreciate the resource.
kenj66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT. The time now is 10:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © TV Fool, LLC