TV Fool  

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 28-Jul-2010, 4:25 PM   #21
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
Chimney mount w/ Solar panels

How small of a chimney are you talking about? and what is it made of?

Town, It's about 2 Ft. wide and 5 Ft. tall made of what looks like stucco? It's not brick. And it's on the side of the roof, with the top of the chimney being about the height of the peak of the roof.
So I'd need a 5 ft. mast to get it 5 Ft. above the roof.
I will post some pics of my roof and the line to the towers.

I also thought about eve mount, but the power line to the house is mounted right at that eve.... hmmm, but if I get it 5 ft. high above the power line I should be fine eh


Considering the cost of solar panels it might be wise to make sure that you locate the antenna in a place where, if it should fall over, it won't take out a panel or more.

Billi, LOL! yer right, never put much thought about the consequences of a fallen antenna.
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-Jul-2010, 4:38 PM   #22
Billiam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 380
^^^In the early 90's I had two very large antennas come down off a tower I had in my backyard thanks to bad weather. Thus, whenever I install a new antenna I make sure it won't take out any important objects like a window or electrical wires. Cables TV wires? I situate the antenna in a spot where if it does fall, it will fall directly on the now uselss and disconnected cable coax. :-)

If you have a stink pipe aka vent pipe on the roof, you may want to use that instead of the stucco structure you mentioned. Unless you know what is underneath the stucco, it would be wise not to attach a chimney strap. May only be 2 x 4's and particle board covered by the stucco. A vent pipe that is sturdy and not shaking around should be adequate as long as you don't use a lot of mast or a huge antenna like the Winegard 8200u. I have a Antennacraft MXU59 and Winegard YA-1713 on my stink pipe and I've had no issues with them moving around.
Billiam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-Jul-2010, 1:12 AM   #23
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
stink pipe

heh, yer funny with the stink pipe... I have one but it's not sturdy enough for a big antenna... unless I reinforce it in the attic....
guess I shouldn't put it on the eve close to the power line in case it comes down... sigh.
looks like I'll try strapping it to the chimney and also mount one side to the roof for reinforcement, king of like a chimney/roof mount.
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-Jul-2010, 7:57 PM   #24
mtownsend
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 632
Yeah, it's best to stay away from power lines. The risk of electrical shock is very real and you don't want to be within reach of any electrified wires while holding a "10 foot metal tree".
mtownsend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-Jul-2010, 8:13 PM   #25
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
10 ft. metal tree

heh, i hear ya, loud and clear - don't mess with power.

been thinking about my signal-
Fm 100.3 comes in so-so by me - in and out.
This frequency is between ch 6 and 7 VHF...
so If I'm having trouble getting VHF, am I in trouble with UHF reception?
Granted the radio is on ground level and the antenna will be 25-30 ft. on the roof...
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-Jul-2010, 9:08 PM   #26
mtownsend
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 632
I don't think so. If you follow the advice given so far, I think you will be fine of TV reception. Putting an antenna on the roof gets you out of a lot of "clutter" (walls, cars, stuff inside the walls, neighboring houses, etc.) that makes reception difficult indoors. With a "clean" signal from your roof using the right size antenna, you should be fine.

BTW, the FM band is just above channel 6, so if you get a TV antenna that supports channels 2-6, you can probably hook up the same antenna feed to your FM receiver to get great reception. Antennas designed for high-VHF only (i.e., channels 7-13 or 7-69) don't go down far enough to help with FM reception.
mtownsend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Aug-2010, 12:17 AM   #27
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
place to mount...

Thanks for all your help guys - been scouting the outside of the house for a place to mount the antenna - I think one of 2 chimneys is best -

One chimney (smaller white one for boiler) is closer to the pine tree in the direction of the tower and the fireplace chimney (brick, bigger) is further back from the tree.
I'm thinking the further back from the tree the better - the only thing with the fireplace chimney is that it has a metal cap - will this impact my signal, with say a 5 ft mast?
Thanks.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSC_0384-1.JPG (93.5 KB, 454 views)
File Type: jpg DSC_0385-2.JPG (112.9 KB, 465 views)

Last edited by olimazi; 3-Aug-2010 at 1:00 AM. Reason: attached pics
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Aug-2010, 8:15 AM   #28
kb2fzq
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 90
The brick chiminey is the winner to mount, the cap should not hurt you at 5 feet up, and the trees don't look like they'll be an issue either. I'd bite the bullet, get a vhf/uhf antenna, mount it and see what you get.....
__________________
DE K2YI
Hudson Falls, N.Y.
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...9fbebf10412194
kb2fzq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Aug-2010, 11:42 AM   #29
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
mast...

cool, thanks, was leaning towards the brick fireplace...
so I will need something like a 7 ft. mast to get 5 ft. above that metal cap - cause I will lose a couple of feet to mounting eh?
off to solidsignal to modify the cart...
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 3-Aug-2010, 12:18 PM   #30
Billiam
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by olimazi View Post
cool, thanks, was leaning towards the brick fireplace...
so I will need something like a 7 ft. mast to get 5 ft. above that metal cap - cause I will lose a couple of feet to mounting eh?
off to solidsignal to modify the cart...
Just buy a ten foot mast and cut it down to the right size. If the local hardware store can't do it then a hack saw should work. Lowes cut a 10 foot piece of EMT for me. May want to look there.
Billiam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Aug-2010, 7:55 AM   #31
kb2fzq
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 90
....or two 5 footers, this way, attach one 5'er to the chiminey, cut the other 5'er to length, attach antenna and coax to that one laying on the roof, then slide that mast onto the chiminey mast...easier and safer...
__________________
DE K2YI
Hudson Falls, N.Y.
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...9fbebf10412194
kb2fzq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Aug-2010, 11:46 AM   #32
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
hmmmm

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb2fzq View Post
....or two 5 footers, this way, attach one 5'er to the chiminey, cut the other 5'er to length, attach antenna and coax to that one laying on the roof, then slide that mast onto the chiminey mast...easier and safer...
wouldn't the 2 masts have to be of different diameter for me to do that?
how would I slide one into the other... with say 2-5ft 1 1/4" pipes?
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 4-Aug-2010, 4:41 PM   #33
mtownsend
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 632
Most products sold as "TV masts" are not just ordinary pipes. In many cases, they already have one end of the pipe tapered so that they can inserted into the end of another section of mast. They also have notches or set screws that prevent the different mast sections from rotating relative to each other.

In other words, they are designed to stack end-to-end without rotating.

You can probably find TV masts at your local Radio Shack, Home Depot, or Lowe's if you want to see how they're built.
mtownsend is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5-Aug-2010, 7:57 AM   #34
kb2fzq
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 90
...and, with my design, if you ever decide to add a rotor, just split the masts and put in the rotor between them...on the chiminey mast, the small diameter end will point up, and on the antenna mast, the large diameter end will point down....
__________________
DE K2YI
Hudson Falls, N.Y.
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...9fbebf10412194
kb2fzq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-Feb-2011, 2:39 PM   #35
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
Question Getting there....

I purchased a Winegard 7698P antenna with Winegard AP-8700 pre amp along w/ 100' of rg-6 coax.
My plan is to eave mount the antenna w/ 5' mast, run the coax loose and connect to tv to see if I get a signal - if everything is good, I do a more permanent installation.

My question is on grounding - there is a unused comcast coax wire entering my foundation, which is connected to a block and is grounded to the water pipe coming out of my well.

I know the correct way to ground is via ground rod/block/wire outside - but can I get away with using the ground block just inside my basement (close to the entry point) for my antenna?

I will pull out the cable company coax, run my new antenna coax through, connect to the block, the run another coax wire to my tv.

John
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-Feb-2011, 4:00 PM   #36
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,749
I'd suggest doing the job right the first time, though many folks "get away with..."

Grounding
__________________
If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

(Please direct account activation inquiries to 'admin')
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-Feb-2011, 5:25 PM   #37
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
Red face grounding

Yer right about doing it the right way - you're definitely not going to like what you see next

How effective would a device like this be?

http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp...rotection&sku=


Quote:
Originally Posted by GroundUrMast View Post
I'd suggest doing the job right the first time, though many folks "get away with..."

Grounding
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-Feb-2011, 5:44 PM   #38
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,749
If the only risk was voltage buildup between the center conductor and shield of the coax, that would be a good option.

Back to your question of
Quote:
... can I get away with using the ground block just inside my basement (close to the entry point) for my antenna?
Some people get away with a lot worse... All I can do is recommend doing it right. The link I posted is a bit to wade through but it does include some links to generic drawings and my somewhat biased opinions on the subject.
__________________
If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

(Please direct account activation inquiries to 'admin')
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-Feb-2011, 7:12 PM   #39
Tower Guy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Delmar, NY
Posts: 1,151
Quote:
Originally Posted by olimazi View Post
I know the correct way to ground is via ground rod/block/wire outside - but can I get away with using the ground block just inside my basement (close to the entry point) for my antenna?
Probably.

It really depends on the length of the ground wire from the ground block to your house ground. If the CATV installer did it right, you'll be safe and legal, but not all CATV installs are done properly.
Tower Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-Feb-2011, 5:27 PM   #40
olimazi
Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 55
ground wire...

Cable coax comes in, about a foot from the foundation, and hits a ground block - the length of the ground wire from the block to the water pipe is about 1 foot.

the Fios guy did a much cleaner install of the fiber than the Comcast guy did with the coax - yer right, it depends on who you get.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tower Guy View Post
Probably.

It really depends on the length of the ground wire from the ground block to your house ground. If the CATV installer did it right, you'll be safe and legal, but not all CATV installs are done properly.
olimazi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT. The time now is 7:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © TV Fool, LLC