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Old 29-Apr-2011, 6:19 AM   #1
hanknum
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Newbie Questions

Hi All,

I just found this site. I started to read up, but there is lots of info.

In a nutshell, we moved and are trying to get away from having dish or cable. We moved to Santa Barbara, CA (93111). I would like to try an antenna for TV. Does anyone have recommendations for under $100. I would like to mount in on the roof on one of the vent pipes. Obviously, I would like to get as many channels as possible, but at least the major networks (sure am going to miss my Speed Channel). Also, any recommendations on where to shop for the best pricing? Lot's of questions...I know.

Thanks in Advance.

Henry
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Old 29-Apr-2011, 3:32 PM   #2
John Candle
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TV Antennas and Reception

As the other question askers do , Do This --> http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=4 , we need the Radar Report. Use your Exact address. If the house is single story house , use 25 feet as antenna height

Last edited by John Candle; 29-Apr-2011 at 3:34 PM.
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Old 1-May-2011, 4:56 AM   #3
hanknum
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Thanks John. I don't know how I would attach that report, but here's my address:

680 Burtis Street
Santa Barbara, CA 93111
single story - 25 ft.

Henry
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Old 1-May-2011, 8:39 AM   #4
John Candle
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TV Antennas and Reception

I suggest a Winegard HD7000R antenna aimed at about 56 degree magnetic compass. Here is how to aim Tv antennas , http://www.kyes.com/antenna/pointing/pointing.html . Here are places to buy Tv antennas and etc. . , http://www.solidsignal.com , http://3starinc.com , http://www.starkelectronic.com , http://www.amazon.com

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Old 1-May-2011, 11:01 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by hanknum View Post
Thanks John. I don't know how I would attach that report, but here's my address:
Here's your TVfool report:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...8d17d2095b4217

You have UHF stations at only 305 degrees and a mixture of VHF and UHF at 69 degrees. One antenna can't do that unless you also buy a rotor.

Consider a small all channel antenna aimed at 69 degrees and a cheap UHF only for 305. Stack them with the smaller antenna above the larger antenna with about 2' spacing. Run two leadins and use an A/B switch to switch directions.

The UHF only can be a DB-2
The VHF-UHF can be
HD7000R
HBU-22
HD7694P
ANT751
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Old 1-May-2011, 3:25 PM   #6
John Candle
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Install the one HD7000R and see what happens for reception of Tv stations in the directions of 56 and 293 magnetic compass. . Direct the antenna at about 56 degree magnetic compass. . Here are some free online Tv guides , http://www.tvfool.com , http://television.aol.com , http://www.zap2it.com , http://tv.yahoo.com , http://tvzap.com , http://tv.entertainment.excite.com

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Old 1-May-2011, 4:08 PM   #7
John Candle
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If good reception does not happen with the HD7000R of the Tv stations at 56 and 293 magnetic compass , then a second antenna will need to be added. I suggest a Antennas Direct - ClearStream 2 UHF antenna - pointed at 293 magnetic compass. Separate RG6 coax will be connected to each antenna and the separate coaxes will be brought to the location of the Tv and connected to a remote control A/B antenna switch , Model number ab27rs or 15-1968. The output of the A/B switch is connected to the Tv.
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Old 2-May-2011, 12:15 AM   #8
GroundUrMast
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If the budget is tight, try the RCA ANT-111 or ANT-121. Available at Amazon and other retailers.

Both are under $15 and installation is as easy as it can possibly get. The down side is you may or may not see K26FT.
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If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 2-May-2011 at 12:17 AM.
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Old 2-May-2011, 7:50 AM   #9
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If you will like to try a indoor antenna , http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=233
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Old 3-May-2011, 5:30 AM   #10
hanknum
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One antenna can't do that unless you also buy a rotor.
When you say "rotor" do you mean a motor that can rotate the antenna?
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Old 3-May-2011, 5:33 AM   #11
hanknum
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Originally Posted by GroundUrMast View Post
If the budget is tight, try the RCA ANT-111 or ANT-121. Available at Amazon and other retailers.

Both are under $15 and installation is as easy as it can possibly get. The down side is you may or may not see K26FT.
What is K26FT?
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Old 3-May-2011, 5:38 AM   #12
hanknum
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If you will like to try a indoor antenna , http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=233
I assume an outdoor one is better than an indoor one...is that correct?

Also, it sounds like there are separate antennas for VHF and UHF. Do I need both? When I was a kid, the only thing we watched on UHF is stuff like Speedracer and Felix the Cat.
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Old 3-May-2011, 6:04 AM   #13
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All of the antennas suggested up to this point, outdoor and indoor, have the capability to receive both UHF and at least those VHF channels available to your area.

With the transition to digital TV broadcasting many stations, though not all, moved to UHF frequencies.

The signal strength and quality is usually better when received by a properly installed outdoor antenna. Most outdoor antennas are directional to one degree or another. The outdoor antennas mentioned above are not extremely directional but may still be directional enough to be able to receive only one of the two groups of stations at a time. (A rotator could be used to aim the antenna at the desired station.)

Most indoor, 'rabbit-ear' style antennas will have nearly equal ability to receive from the front and rear. In your case that could be an advantage over the more directional outdoor antennas because you have signals coming from two directions. There is a risk that the building construction may block or reflect too much signal for reliable reception. Metal studs, siding and insulation foil are likely to cause trouble. The wire mesh embedded in masonry and stucco is also a common cause of indoor reception trouble.

Yous is a case where 'less could be more'.

Felix the Cat is awesome! Speedracer... MEHHH, not so much
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If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 3-May-2011 at 6:13 AM.
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Old 3-May-2011, 11:20 AM   #14
Esteban
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Also, I would not mount to a vent pipe, unless it is a taller steel pipe, rather than one made of PVC.
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Old 3-May-2011, 3:07 PM   #15
John Candle
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If you type K26FT in the GOOGLE search box you will find information about K26FT. If you type the other tv stations call letters in the GOOGLE search box you will find information about those tv stations all so.
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Old 3-May-2011, 3:11 PM   #16
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Type 9521a in the GOOGLE search box.
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Old 3-May-2011, 3:31 PM   #17
hanknum
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Thanks all for your input.

I think I'm going to try a HD7000R on the roof first and see what I get. Do you guys think that I should get a motor to rotate it, or is that not really necessary?

Right now I just have indoor antenna (Philips SDV2210/17) and using an Access HD digital to analog converter. I assume that I'm going to still have to use the converter with the new antenna, right? My TV is a Sony KV-30HS420 30-Inch FD Trinitron WEGA HD-Ready Widescreen CRT TV (about 8 years old).

I also have an older RCA Colortrak Plus CRT. Any recommendations on a converter box for that TV?

Thanks again guys.
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Old 3-May-2011, 4:15 PM   #18
GroundUrMast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanknum View Post
...Right now I just have indoor antenna (Philips SDV2210/17) and using an Access HD digital to analog converter...
How has that been working for you? Can you list the channels that are reliably received? Are there channels that you are having trouble with?

It would helpful if you could refer to the real channel rather than virtual channel numbers.

Because you have two sets, I would think you would find a rotator inconvenient for the viewer who does not have control of the antenna direction. There is a chance you may get acceptable reception from the rear of the outdoor antenna... if so, you will not need a rotator or second antenna.
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If the well is dry and you don't see rain on the horizon, you'll need to dig the hole deeper. (If the antenna can't get the job done, an amp won't fix it.)

(Please direct account activation inquiries to 'admin')

Last edited by GroundUrMast; 3-May-2011 at 4:45 PM.
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Old 3-May-2011, 4:24 PM   #19
John Candle
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Here are reliable converter boxes , http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=380
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Old 3-May-2011, 4:46 PM   #20
John Candle
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CM 9521A rotor and a tv antenna works well with with one tv connected , who ever has the rotor remote control , controls the direction the antenna is pointed. If more then one tv is connected to the antenna then there will be disagreements of what tv stations the antenna is pointed.
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