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Old 3-Feb-2011, 5:04 AM   #21
scott784
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So then the copper ground wire could be buried from the point it leaves the antenna/mast all the way to the main electrical box. 'Or' maybe, you are saying, it is optional to leave it above ground through part of the journey to the electrical box and then bury it around such areas as my patio out back? So the elevation of the ground wire does not 'have' to remain the same height throughout the link back to the electrical box? Is that right?

Also, what about the rotator wire? I am not aware of that being able to be grounded to a ground block (unlike the coax line). So does that rotator wire just get left out of all of this?

Second, I agree with your assessment of having everything tied in with the main electrical ground if I can make it happen. I know this is what you advocate and nothing else. However, I would be curious to know your thoughts on my earlier question. Is it your position that grounding the mast and coax only (without being tied in with the main electrical), is at least better than no ground at all? Or is it your position that this scenario is worse than no ground at all?

If you could share your thoughts on these specific questions, I would appreciate it. Thanks again.

Last edited by scott784; 3-Feb-2011 at 5:31 AM.
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Old 3-Feb-2011, 3:50 PM   #22
GroundUrMast
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As I see it, the whole object of grounding is to hold conductive materials at the same voltage if and when a fault exists, and to do so in a way that will not pose an undue risk of fire due to heating of conductors. If you choose not to connect the antenna system to the rest of the premise ground system or you use conductors with too much impedance, those goals a not met.

One could argue that some ground is better than no ground... I believe there are many examples of 'grounding' that give the illusion of protection, but for reasons I've already explained, will fail to protect persons and / or property if a real fault occurs. One could also argue that rather than creating new risk, inadequate grounding methods simply shift or modify the risk.

I'm quite certain that you can bury part and run the other above grade... Codes vary regarding the burial depth or what protection from damage is required.
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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 3-Feb-2011 at 5:16 PM.
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Old 3-Feb-2011, 11:57 PM   #23
scott784
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The NEC does not seem to speak specifically about rotator wires. What about those? How could a rotator wire being tied into the ground block? If it cannot be, 'and' if the rotator cord is left unplugged inside, then I suppose there is no issue with the rotator wire coming into the house, right?

I've got a rotator with my antenna. However, I have found that I have little need to use it and so for the most part, I never rotate my antenna. What are your thoughts on that? Thanks.
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Old 4-Feb-2011, 1:54 AM   #24
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You are reminding me of another reason I dislike rotators.

The reality is that vendors of rotators will instruct you to use some form of discharge or grounding protection but few seem to produce or sell such a thing. Here are two choices: http://www.dxengineering.com/Parts.a...tNo=PPC-IS-RCT and the design by Eagle Aspen that sends control signals and power via the coax. http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp...0Rotators&sku= (I have heard mixed reviews for the E. A. rotator)

Telco provides this type of protection every day using several different versions of this: http://www.bourns.com/data/global/pd...56M%29revA.pdf The challenge is to find a retail source. Graybar is a possible source. (A traditional phone line will operate at a maximum of 52 VDC when idle, 'ringing' applies 90 VAC between the two conductors. Not that much different than rotator power and control.)
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Old 4-Feb-2011, 2:16 AM   #25
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Yes, I guess they can be a pain in the butt. Especially, if they ever stop working and the antenna is turned in the wrong direction! In my case, it's brand new; but I've already found that I really don't need to use the rotator much afterall.

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