TV Fool  

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 1-Oct-2012, 1:09 PM   #1
way2tyred
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3
help with one channel please

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...2df9e9986a6a84

This is our tvfool report. We have the GE amplified 31 element antenna.

We cannot PBS, which is a necessity for us. Pointed towards the south we get all the networks, CW, and the Christian stations go in and out. We also pick up the Fox and NBC from the east. if we turn it towards the east we don't gain anything but we totally lose the christian channels.

Our house is surrounded on the south and east sides by 50 ft+ trees. Planning on permenantly mounting this weekend at 20 ft, right now its around 15.

Thanks for any help!
way2tyred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1-Oct-2012, 1:33 PM   #2
elmo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 232
Sounds like a tough situation w/the trees and the distance. If you dial the antenna in with a compass specifically to 104 degrees, can you get anything at all from the PBS station? Even if you do I'd imagine a breeze blowing through could be an issue, breaking up any signal you may be able to get.

Can you add height w/a mast?
What about mounting as far away from the trees as possible?
Also, what about a rotor? They're not convenient when surfing channels, but if you know what you want to watch, you can point accordingly.
elmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 1-Oct-2012, 7:26 PM   #3
teleview
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The tvfool report is to street level only , please make a tvfool report with exact address.

If exact address does not work then go to the tvfool home page , click on >>Start MAPS<< , move pointer to the exact location , make antenna height 20 feet and click on make tvfool radar plot map and post it back here at your thread.

What is the make and model number of the the GE antenna and amplifier??
  Reply With Quote
Old 1-Oct-2012, 9:51 PM   #4
way2tyred
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...2df9e524534b73

I'm sorry, I thought I did. The antenna is 24767.

I would love to have my husband cut down some of these trees (they are all pine which I hate) but unfortunately they are all on our neighbor's land.

It is quite confusing to me. We get some channels that aren't on that list (or at least the call numbers listed are different than what our TV shows), we get some with the same call numbers but on a different channel, and some we do not get at all.
way2tyred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 2:55 AM   #5
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,773
Thanks for the new link. When one clicks on the KLTL call sign in your TV Fool report, the path profile is displayed. It shows few if any hills in the path between the transmitter and your location which is good. This means that a few feet higher mounting may be enough to make a difference.

If it's necessary, can you mount higher than 20'? (Considering safety and budget)
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 7:17 AM   #6
teleview
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
So far not able to find any ->definitive information <- on the GE 24767 antenna , other then it is a VHF/UHF design and has -> no <- amplifier.
As is typical of no name antennas , orphan antennas that have been sitting in a warehouse somewhere , are sold for little money in job lots and have , little to no information , and what information is is usually not correct. The product is rebranded , often times not even put in a new box , just put a sticker on the box and now it is a different brand.

Recommend aim the antenna at about 160 degree magnetic compass direction.

Here is how to aim antennas , http://www.kyes.com/antenna/pointing/pointing.html.

Adjust aim of antenna for best reception of PBS at 110 degree magnetic compass direction with out losing the reception of the Tv stations to the south west at about 199 degree magnetic compass direction.

Install a Antennas Direct CPA-19 preamp.

For 1 Tv connection use no splitter.

For 2 Tv's connected use a , HFS-2D , 2 way splitter.

For 3 Tv's connected use a , HFS-3D , 3 way splitter.

Buy the HFS splitters at , http://www.hollandelectronics.com , http://www.solidsignal.com.

Here are some places to buy the CPA-19 preamp.

http://www.solidsignal.com , http://www.amazon.com.

Last edited by teleview; 2-Oct-2012 at 11:27 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 5:38 PM   #7
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,773
The GE 24767 appears to be an Antennacraft OEM design sold under the GE name.

http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=137766
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/ge-85-i...l#.UGsl51bYUvQ

It appears to closely resemble the current Antennacraft C290.

http://www.antennacraft.net/Antennas...llChannel.html

I have not found any detail re. the bundled amplifier either.
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 8:18 PM   #8
way2tyred
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3
Thank you all for your help. We really appreciate your time, especially my husband and my kids (who are in cartoon withdrawals right now).

I think 20 ft was just an arbitrary number he decided on based upon the lengths of pipe he is able to get from his shop. He's going to put it up at 30 ft this weekend and see if that does it. If not, we will try the preamp.

Is there any kind of info you can give us on securing a mast that is a certain height? I.E. At what height does there need to be some additional support and what's the best way to give that? His plan is to have the mast secured to the house from the ground up. Our roofline is about 12 up, so there would be an additional 18 ft of mast freestanding.

Also one more question concerning reception. He hasn't grounded the antenna yet, will do that this weekend also. I've read that helps reception. Does it seem to make a noticible difference?

Thanks again.
way2tyred is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 9:15 PM   #9
GroundUrMast
Moderator
 
GroundUrMast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Seattle Area
Posts: 4,773
If the mast (pipe) is in 10' sections, I would secure guy wires at or near the junctions (every 10'). The guy wires and mast will be less stressed if the guy-wire anchors are far away from the base of the mast. A clamp with eyes for guy-wire may be quite useful. http://www.3starinc.com/adjustable_3...enna_mast.html

A stock answer re. Grounding,
Grounding the mast and coax shield are prudent and relatively inexpensive steps that limit the buildup of static-electricity which can damage the tuner. When done correctly, grounding can also reduce the risk caused by a nearby lighting strike.

http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=901

Grounding in a basic system is a two step process:

1) Connect a #10 gauge copper wire to the antenna mast. A bronze ground clamp such as the Halex #36020 is well suited for this application. Run the wire directly to the electrical service ground. Avoid sharp bends in the wire. (If the ground wire between the service panel and ground rod is accessible, an Intersystem Bonding Termination devise can be placed onto the ground wire without cutting or disconnecting it. This provides a means to connect the #10 mast ground wire to the existing ground wire close to the ground rod outside the building. If possible, avoid running the new ground wire inside the building, energy from static or electrical storms is best directed to ground before it has any path into the building. The mast ground wire can be bare or insulated, your choice.)

2) Run the coax from the antenna to a location close to the electrical service ground. Install a ground block and with another peice of #10 wire, connect it to the electrical service ground at the same point you connected the mast ground.

I don't recommend short-cuts such as driving a new ground rod that is not connected to the existing electrical service ground. An isolated ground rod often has a high resistance that provides very limited ground connection. The goal is to connect to the same ground system that protects the rest of the home.

Surge protectors located inside outlet strips at the TV, computer or similar devises are worth consideration. A surge protector with a high joule rating is able to absorb more fault energy than a unit with a lower joule rating. Some surge protection units include phone jacks and F-connectors to enable protection of a phone line, coax cable and the power cable(s). However, in the case of an outdoor mounted antenna, this type of protection should not be considered a 'first-line of defense'.

Last edited by GroundUrMast; 3-Oct-2012 at 12:02 AM. Reason: Added link for EZ 43-A Guy ring
GroundUrMast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 2-Oct-2012, 11:41 PM   #10
teleview
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
As always , trees and tree leaves do a real fine job of reducing or blocking Tv reception and so do buildings and other obstructions.

It is best to install a antenna at a location that has the least amount to no amount of any type or kind obstructions in the directions of reception.

A gap in the trees.

When the trees are close , I have put the antenna on the other side of the trees when there are little to no trees beyond.

And can even mount a antenna in a tree , straight pine trees are good antenna towers. http://www.ronard.com , http://www.ronard.com/tree_adjust.html.

Cut branches away in such a manner that no branches can whip around and destroy the antenna.

Last edited by teleview; 2-Oct-2012 at 11:44 PM.
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Go Back   TV Fool > Over The Air Services > Help With Reception


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT. The time now is 9:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright © TV Fool, LLC