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Old 7-Feb-2010, 5:26 PM   #1
tony2tall
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VHF Antenna Needed.

Recently put a Channel Master 4228 (8 Bow Tie) in my attic along with a 4-way Video Signal Amplifier (10dB) feeding 3 TVs. Reason for amplifier > TVs 2 & 3 were not receiving same channels as #1 TV which had the shortest run to antenna

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...724342a064ef2e

5.1 & 40.1 No Reception

13.1 Fair/Poor

Good reception > 24.1-30.1-50.1-10.1-23

Great reception > 48.1-8.1-3.1-19.1

I would like to pick up 5.1 & improve 13.1 signal. Appears I will need a VHF antenna to do that. What antenna would you recommend? How will I connect the 2? I have saw a combiner on-line but unsure if my Radio Shack will have it.
Do I need to add a amplifier for antenna? If so what do you recommend?
I anticipate decrease in reception when trees leave out so I may need amplifier for the 4228 to keep the presently Good reception channels stable.
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Old 8-Feb-2010, 8:14 AM   #2
mtownsend
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tony2tall View Post
I would like to pick up 5.1 & improve 13.1 signal. Appears I will need a VHF antenna to do that. What antenna would you recommend?
Hello and welcome!

Yes, you are right. The 4228 is a UHF only antenna, and it would be wise to supplement it with a VHF antenna. Some of your more distant VHF stations cover both low-VHF (WMC, ch 5) and high-VHF (WHBQ, ch 13), so this would warrant a full-VHF antenna like the Winegard HD5030.



Quote:
How will I connect the 2?
What you need is a UVSJ band separator/combiner/diplexor. This will efficiently combine the two different frequency bands (UHF and VHF) onto a single coax with minimal signal degradation for both ports (about 0.5 dB of loss). This is much better than what you'd typically get out of a standard 2-way splitter/combiner (about 3.5 dB of loss).



Quote:
Do I need to add a amplifier for antenna?
I would recommend avoiding any kind of amplification if you can. Your two strongest local stations (ch 20 and 48) are probably too strong for most amps to handle. This can drive an amp too hard and cause signal distortion, which ultimately can make things worse rather than better.

If you add a proper VHF antenna to your setup, the VHF stations might be strong enough to eliminate the need for the distribution amp too. 5.1 and 13.1 should come in much better with the added VHF capability. Going from a 4228-only to a VHF antenna like the 5030 means you're probably gaining about 7 dB on channel 13 and over 15 dB on channel 5.



Quote:
I anticipate decrease in reception when trees leave out so I may need amplifier for the 4228 to keep the presently Good reception channels stable.
I would suggest leaving the amps out of the configuration at first. Aim your antennas at compass heading 138 degrees and check for reception on all TVs. If the TVs on the longer cable runs are having trouble, you can try adding the distribution amp back in.
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Old 10-Feb-2010, 2:30 AM   #3
tony2tall
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Appreciate your response!
Would you also recommend using a Channel Master 1110 VHF? It is listed to receive at longer distances than the Winegard HD5030
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Old 10-Feb-2010, 5:48 AM   #4
mtownsend
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Originally Posted by tony2tall View Post
Would you also recommend using a Channel Master 1110 VHF?
Sure, the CM 1110 is a BIG antenna that will work, but it is no longer in production.



Quote:
It is listed to receive at longer distances than the Winegard HD5030
Just FYI, mileage ratings on antennas are somewhat arbitrary (mostly driven by marketing) and could be way off. Real situations will vary with terrain, buildings, trees, and other factors that are unique to each setup. Mileage ratings should not be used to compare antennas.

What really matters is the net gain of the antenna, which is a directly measurable quantity (or can be derived from detailed computer models).
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