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Old 7-Mar-2015, 7:02 PM   #1
keller525
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Are All Tuners Created Equal?

I have an older cheapo Westinghouse HD flat panel in my bedroom (about 8 years old) and am getting some random pixelation despite having a relatively strong signal (5-6 out of 7 bars). I wonder if I might have better luck with a newer television equipped with a better internal tuner? Does this make any sense or is the picture quality strictly dependent on the antenna?

I understand that the tuner can only do so much with the signal but I seem to be about 98% there on the major networks and wonder if a different tuner could get me all the way there.

Thoughts? Are there any "stand-out" tuners or televisions which I should consider? Is periodic pixelation just a fact of life with OTA TV?

Thank you!!!
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Old 7-Mar-2015, 7:09 PM   #2
Jake V
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Please post your TV Fool Report [ http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=14508 ] and what antenna you are using, the antenna location and what direction the antenna is pointed in.

Regarding tuners, the tuners are better in some televisions then in others. Even in new televisions.

Others will post. Be patient.
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Old 7-Mar-2015, 7:15 PM   #3
keller525
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake V View Post
Please post your TV Fool Report [ http://forum.tvfool.com/showthread.php?t=14508 ] and what antenna you are using, the antenna location and what direction the antenna is pointed in.

Regarding tuners, the tuners are better in some televisions then in others. Even in new televisions.

Others will post. Be patient.
Here is my TV Signal Report: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...f1f08942a0e200

I tried out a number of interior set top antennas in different locations within my home (this is for an apartment application in Chicago). The best one so far seems to be the Terk OMNITV1A but I am open to using others if there are stand-outs in this category.

Last edited by keller525; 7-Mar-2015 at 7:18 PM.
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Old 7-Mar-2015, 7:26 PM   #4
Jake V
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You have a good TV Fool Report. It is unlikely you would need an amplified antenna. Others will comment on better options for an indoor antenna (probably a Terk HDTV-A).

Do you have a south facing window or door? If yes, aim your antenna through it (if there is a metal screen take it off first). See what difference it makes on your problem channels. [What are your problem channels and are in the in the direction your antenna is pointed in?]

What is your apartment building made of? If it's stucco (for example) that can kill the signal that gets to your antenna.
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Old 7-Mar-2015, 7:50 PM   #5
GroundUrMast
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Quote:
Are All Tuners Created Equal?
No.

That said... manufacturers are not known to offer any information re. the performance of their tuners.

I'm only able to compare the TV's and Set Top Box tuners that I've got... Based on that, I can say my newest TV, a Samsung 50UE5300, slightly out performs my older Toshiba and Visio TVs.


As far as differences between indoor antennas: You'll only find slight differences because they are all limited to roughly the same size, with limited performance in terms of gain and directivity. Some will have UHF only capability so there ability to receive VHF signals will be noticeably worse than antennas intentionally designed to cover both the UHF and VHF bands. Amplifying the output of a small antenna does not improve the antennas performance. Usually, the amplifier is more gimmick than anything else. Amplifiers are for overcoming losses from signal splitting and long cable runs. The short cable on a the typical indoor antenna has no significant amount of loss, so the amplifier has no real purpose than to fool the consumer into spending more money.

Indoor reception is often plagued with problems of building penetration losses, signal reflections, and interference from the electronics and appliances in the typical indoor setting. An outdoor antenna design may help overcome these factors, but some indoor settings are simply black holes of reception.
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Last edited by GroundUrMast; 7-Mar-2015 at 7:54 PM.
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